Researchers Find New Way to Track Hidden Object Using Optical Noise

The system tracks a target enclosed in a 'scattering box' that impedes direct imaging. As the object moves, it imposes fluctuations on the light coming out of the box. The light is then collected by an integrating detector, which uses an algorithm to distinguish natural noise from the fluctuations caused by the object.

The system tracks a target enclosed in a 'scattering box' that impedes direct imaging. As the object moves, it imposes fluctuations on the light coming out of the box. The light is then collected by an integrating detector, which uses an algorithm to distinguish natural noise from the fluctuations caused by the object.

July 31, 2017 | Source: Phys Org, phys.org, 20 April 2017, Milad I. Akhlaghi et al

Researchers have developed a new solution to tracking objects hidden behind scattering media by analyzing the fluctuations in optical "noise" created by their movement. In The Optical Society's journal for high impact research, Optica, researchers from the University of Central Florida (CREOL) demonstrate their technique by tracking the location of an object as it is moved within an enclosed box.

The approach could help advance real-time remote sensing for military and other applications. For example, it could be used to track vehicles or aircraft traveling through fog. It could also be useful for areas of biomedical research that involve fast-moving particles that cannot be observed directly, according to the researchers.