Penn Engineers Develop First Tunable, Chip-Based “Vortex Microlaser” and Detector, Encode Information in Twisting Beams of Light

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Vortex lasers are named for the way light spirals around their axis of travel, thanks to a property known as orbital angular momentum, or OAM. Different OAM “modes” correspond to the direction and spacing of those spirals, and given a sensitive enough laser and detector, could be another property in which information could be transmitted.

May 29, 2020 | Originally published by Penn Engineering on May 14, 2020

Vortex lasers are named for the way light spirals around their axis of travel, thanks to a property known as orbital angular momentum, or OAM. Different OAM “modes” correspond to the direction and spacing of those spirals, and given a sensitive enough laser and detector, could be another property in which information could be transmitted.

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