Researchers Resolve a Problem That Has Been Holding Back a Technological Revolution

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August 26, 2016 | Originally published by Date Line: August 26 on

Imagine an electronic newspaper that you could roll up and spill your coffee on, even as it updated itself before your eyes. It”s an example of the technological revolution that has been waiting to happen, except for one major problem that, until now, scientists have not been able to resolve.Researchers at McMaster University have cleared that obstacle by developing a new way to purify carbon nanotubes – the smaller, nimbler semiconductors that are expected to replace silicon within computer chips and a wide array of electronics.”Once we have a reliable source of pure nanotubes that are not very expensive, a lot can happen very quickly,” says Alex Adronov, a professor of Chemistry at McMaster whose research team has developed a new and potentially cost-efficient way to purify carbon nanotubes.

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