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Recent Inquiries

Risk Factors and Models to Assess the Defense Industrial Base (DIB)

DSIAC was tasked with finding reports and relevant information on what risk factors, risk assessments, data sources, and algorithms are used for determining real risk to the DIB. The inquirer was looking for risk factors…

Radiation Detection Drone Swarming Systems

The Defense Systems Information Analysis Center (DSIAC) was asked to locate systems for swarm drone missions and pattern analysis for radiation detection. DSIAC searched opensource documents for relevant information and contacted subject matter experts (SMEs)…

Threat Evaluation and Weapon Allocation/Assignment (TEWA) Algorithms

DSIAC was asked for research papers, journals, and points of contact relevant to threat evaluation and weapon assignment (TEWA) algorithms to assist in the development of algorithms to assign threat values to hostile targets. DSIAC…

Articles

Algorithmic Warfare: DARPA’s “AI Next” Program Bearing Fruit

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) made headlines last fall when it announced that it was pledging $2 billion for a multiyear effort to develop new artificial intelligence (AI) technology. “Months later, DARPA’s ”AI Next” program is already bearing fruit,” said Peter Highnam, the agency’s Deputy Director. “DARPA — which has, for decades, fostered

DARPA Tests Advanced Chemical Sensors

Next-generation algorithms and sensors for detecting chemical threats put through their paces in SIGMA+ program. May hold promise for military use in development of large region scale chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive threat threat detection networks. DARPA’s SIGMA program, which began in 2014, has demonstrated a city-scale capability for detecting radiological and nuclear threats

Hummingbird Robot Using AI to Go Soon Where Drones Can’t

What can fly like a bird and hover like an insect? Your friendly neighborhood hummingbirds. If drones had this combo, they would be able to maneuver better through collapsed buildings and other cluttered spaces to find trapped victims. Purdue University researchers have engineered flying robots that behave like hummingbirds, trained by machine learning algorithms based